Mushroom

White mushrooms are rich in many bioactive compounds that may protect against cancer and heart disease, as well as help improve blood sugar control and gut health.

mushroom or toadstool is the fleshy, spore-bearing fruiting body of a fungus, typically produced above ground, on soil, or on its food source. Toadstool generally denotes one poisonous to humans. The standard for the name “mushroom” is the cultivated white button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus; hence the word “mushroom” is most often applied to those fungi (BasidiomycotaAgaricomycetes) that have a stem, a cap, and gills.

Most mushrooms sold in supermarkets have been commercially grown on mushroom farms and are considered safe to eat because they are grown in controlled, sterilized environments. Agaricus bisporus can be harvested at varying stages of maturity. When young and immature, they are known as white mushrooms if they have a white color, or crimini mushrooms if they have slight brown shade. When fully grown, they’re known as portobello mushrooms, which are bigger and darker. White mushrooms are also known as table, common, button, or champignon mushrooms. They have a small stem, smooth cap, and mild flavor that pairs well with many dishes.

White mushrooms are low in calories and sugar. They are also high in protein and vitamin D, and they’re a source of vitamin B12, so they are beneficial for those following plant-based diets. They are rich in many bioactive compounds that protect against cancer and heart disease, and help improve blood sugar control and gut health.

One cup (96 g) of whole white mushrooms provides
Calories: 21
Carbs: 3 grams
Fiber: 1 gram
Protein: 3 grams
Fat: 0 grams
Vitamin D: 33% of the Daily Value (DV)
Selenium: 16% of the DV
Phosphorus: 12% of the DV
Folate: 4% of the DV
Due t
CARBOHYDRATE3 g
CALORIES21
FIBER1 g
PROTEIN3 g
PHOSPHOROUS12% DV
SELENIUM16% DV
VITAMIN B9 (FOLATE)4% DV
VITAMIN D33% DV
SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA / HEALTHLINE